Friday, June 1, 2018

ChangeLab: Creating an Equitable Parks System

Cross-posted from Changelabsolutions.org, on what could have been for Ogletown-S. Newark. Too bad the region's Legislators didn't think and act likewise. 

No matter where you live, there should be an appealing park nearby. A Complete Parks system ensures that all people can enjoy a great local park. As common venues for sports games, farmers markets, and festivals, parks are important places to gather, exercise, and relax, whether to socialize or to have time for ourselves. Parks enhance communities, promoting health and relationships. The Complete Parks approach is a way to make the benefits of parks available for everyone in your neighborhood, town, city, or county.

Start improving your parks system, using this suite of Complete Parks tools:
  • Complete Parks Overview introduces the Complete Parks approach, the goals of a Complete Parks system, and the 7 Complete Parks elements. Examples from Houston and Philadelphia illustrate key features of the Complete Parks approach. This document is written for people who are interested in improving parks in a comprehensive, collaborative, and strategic way.
  • Complete Parks Playbook describes in greater detail the 7 elements of a safe, connected, and healthy parks system. It suggests policies for improving each element and presents success stories from California cities. An abbreviated Spanish-language version of the Complete Parks Playbook—Los sistemas completos de parques—is also available.
  • Complete Parks Indicators recommends indicators for assessing a parks system and measuring its evolution into a Complete Parks system.
  • Complete Parks Model Resolution provides sample language that a city or county government can use to commit to creating a Complete Parks system and establish a formal process for developing a Complete Parks plan.
  • Funding Complete Parks presents ways for local agencies in California to fund a Complete Parks system or increase funding for parks.
What makes a park successful depends heavily on neighborhood context, so a Complete Parks plan calls on many sectors to improve people’s entire experience with parks -- getting to a park, spending time there, safety and maintenance, and proximity to quality schools, affordable housing, local businesses, key services, and more. This comprehensive take on parks and its multi-sectoral focus make the Complete Parks approach especially relevant for people who want to advance equity initiatives, community engagement, and multi-agency coordination within local government. See the overview HERE.

Poster's note: A neighborhood's "community" park doesn't qualify. In NCC, these are usually a small to mid-sized grassy expanse with maybe a basketball or tennis court. Yet some on NCC Council believe that, because some of these exist in the region, Ogletown-S. Newark has "more than enough parks already". What a farce these legislators really are.

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